don’t touch my hair

It's a notion that every black woman feels at one point or another, and Solange Knowles captured the frustration and politics of the subject beautifully on her A Seat at the Table album in the song Don't Touch My Hair. For one, as black women, we're statistically at the bottom of the social, economic, professional totem …

New slave-traders on the rise: Why do the Kardashian-Jenners keep getting a pass?

I really have no interest whatsoever in the Kardashian-Jenner klan. I'm not fond of their pursuit and pride in being culture vultures, I don't care for their tactics of being famous for being famous, I don't care for their diva attitudes and that they find a way to make it seem as if they are …

Young, black, & educated: College & beyond

All my life, I’ve attended primarily white schools, and every seemingly simple task — from juggling classes and teachers and finding a friend group, to joining clubs and organizations that are a good fit — had a similar obstacle: entering spaces that have a smaller black population. The majority always has a preconceived notion of …

Royal wedding: Reasons why I didn’t wake up early to watch

I didn't care much for the royal wedding — as in: I didn't care to follow the news on how things were progressing before the wedding, I didn't care about how the couple met, I didn't even care enough to actually WATCH the wedding when it was happening. First, I wasn't the one marrying Prince …

Whole foods and Starbucks: How to transform ‘gentrification’ into ‘community evolvement’

Whole Foods was the ultimate sign that Harlem had become a NEW Harlem. It showed outsiders that the residents were willing to conform and change, willing to assimilate into mass society. Something as simple as Whole Foods took away the identity, the individualism, the uniqueness of Harlem. To me, it signified the end of a …